Broken Borders (2012) + Shattered Sky (2003-2014)

   I observed an increasing violence and negative connotations in relationship with immigrants and international borders in the years leading up to the Brexit vote. Nationlistic propaganda openly displayed in the streets and the Media.

   My intention was to capture the moment of rupture of a matrix creating a map without references, where the final composition is dictated by chance following a personalized embossing technique.The fragments recall aerial views.

    A simple line can be interpreted in many different ways, it can be a separation ,a limitation ,or  it can be a path to be followed.

    The seeds of this project was first planted in my Shattered Sky installation in 2003, and reworked and exhibited in London in 2014.

Shattered Sky (2003,2014) 

These series inspired When the sky fell -Text by Dr. Paula Serafini

  The map defines the country by giving it limits. It defines provinces, cities and neighbourhoods, as subdivisions or aggregates, depending on how we look.

Argentina is a country that can’t seem to forget this fact; it is made out of fragments, which are clearly defined and differentiated against the blue and white backdrop of the nation. Mar del Plata, El Chaco, Buenos Aires. Isolated, melancholic, self-standing.

   Argentina doesn’t feel like a well put- together country simply because it is not one. Its thousands of divisions can’t seem to stay together. Sure all countries have divisions, but Argentina’s cracks are not those of its geographical limits: they are those of its memories.

   In When the Sky Fell, Pia Jaime examines the links between the geography of a country and the sentiment of a society. A history of violence and repression and a present of political antagonism make themselves seen in a sincere representation of her country. In her work, Argentina is seen as an addition of fragments that from a distance seems as a whole, but up close is segmented, rough in the edges, yet full of beauty in its cracks.

  When the sky fell, the map defines the country by giving it limits. It defines provinces, cities and neighbourhoods, as subdivisions or aggregates, depending on how we look.

Argentina is a country that can’t seem to forget this fact; it is made out of fragments, which are clearly defined and differentiated against the blue and white backdrop of the nation. Mar del Plata, El Chaco, Buenos Aires. Isolated, melancholic, self-standing.

   Argentina doesn’t feel like a well put- together country simply because it is not one. Its thousands of divisions can’t seem to stay together. Sure all countries have divisions, but Argentina’s cracks are not those of its geographical limits: they are those of its memories.

    In When the Sky Fell, Pia Jaime examines the links between the geography of a country and the sentiment of a society. A history of violence and repression and a present of political antagonism make themselves seen in a sincere representation of her country. In her work, Argentina is seen as an addition of fragments that from a distance seems as a whole, but up close is segmented, rough in the edges, yet full of beauty in its cracks.

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